Coaches Interview

A questionaire from one of my members. Coach Interview I had a few years ago. G’day John, if you could provide as much feedback for the questions as possible, it’d be very much appreciated. Thanks for your time! What is your coaching philosophy? Footy is not a hard game to play Everyone in the football…

A questionaire from one of my members.

Coach Interview I had a few years ago.

G’day John, if you could provide as much feedback for the questions as possible, it’d be very much appreciated. Thanks for your time!

  1. What is your coaching philosophy?
  • Footy is not a hard game to play
  • Everyone in the football netball club is very important
  • Create respect, have quality relationships

 

  1. With players such as Simon Black and Michael Voss was it hard to not favour them compared to a lower skilled player?
  • Didn’t have favourites during coaching (You only have favourites after you finish coaching)
  • These two players are quality people always doing what was necessary for the team. The team always came first, not themselves.
  1. What is the first thing you would do when walking into a new team of AFL players?
  • Talk about the perception of the club as an outsider
  • Talk about my beliefs for the future, changes that need to be made etc etc.
  • Once again talk about the quality of people operating the club (even though your thoughts may change after you get to know the staff.
  • Everything has to be in a positive manner.
  1. As a past coach and player do you think the game these days is better or worse and why?
  • The fitness of players is superb (full time) The skills have improved out of sight. (except shooting for goal 30 out in front)
  • Today’s football is having athletes, for continued running and the mind of a footballer, with football smarts.
  • The game of yesteryear was exciting, pack mark and aerial displays were brilliant, long kicking was a feature of the game and set positional plays.
  • The game today is generally quick movement all over the ground. Players knowledge of one another with a mindset of creating space. Sides today are always trying to maintain possession of the ball no matter or which direction they go in, Most sides are displaying a better spectacle of our great game than a few years ago. The wheel is turning. After all that, the game is improving to a higher standard than it was.
  1. What was the most frustrating thing about being a coach?
  • Knowing certain players have enormous ability and not playing to that potential and not prepared to do the extra work to raise their standard which will make them a much better player and as a result the team performs better.
  1. What first attracted you to the coaching position?
  • Nothing
  • Thought I had done enough at Richmond as a player (eight years, over 100 games, two premierships, being payed $30 per game I retired at the age of 27 yrs)
  • Took up coaching didn’t know if I would be any good, however it just expanded from there. Coached for 14 years prior to getting my first role as a senior AFL coach for the Sydney Swans.
  1. How far into the future do you plan for your coach? (As in week to week training or long term goals)
  • AFL we would plan three/four weeks ahead of each game
  • I had four scouts who would go to different opposition training as well as game days
  • Each game we played we had a volume of data about each opponent and their team. This of course was used in a common sense way for our player information.
  • Our long term goals were always reviewed (3/4 Weeks)depending how we were travelling.

 

8, What do you view as a strength in your coach and what makes a good coach?

  • To me, having respect as a coach is the most important aspect of coaching. If you don’t have respect from your players, “you aint goin nowhere” (an old saying)
  • Being able to read personalities and adopt strategies to help each player perform.
  1. How did you manage different personalities in a team?
  • Good strong communication
  • At Melb. I had Stynes and O’Dwyer both wanting to be no 1 ruckman and both being fierce competitors, after many many meetings with both it was decided (as a compromise) they would share the role and change in the forward pocket. (Depending on weather conditions) The following week the other would start no 1 ruckman, this worked until O’Dwyer became injured, Stynes took over the mantle of no 1 ruckman and never looked back. Steve O’Dwyer was later traded to Richmond after having a series of injuries.
  1. Having coached 300+ games, which is an amazing feat, do you ever reflect on the 1988 grand final lost to hawthorn and think what could have been?
  • No.  Up until the GF our form had been excellent however I do believe all the hype, the street parade, (1st Time) directors wanting players at their functions and all the rest of the Bullshit that goes on prior to the GF I think mentally we were pretty well spent before game day.
  • Spending seven years at Melb, two night premierships, first time in the finals for 23 years (1964 last time) 5 finals appearances, 1 Famous prelim final with all that I am very, very disappointed with our display that GF day, when it’s over it’s over nothing can be done, hopefully learn from the experience, working hard to have another crack at that elusive opportunity.
  1. What has been the most difficult thing you've had to do as coach? (At AFL level)
  • Tell a player he wasn’t in the Prelim final in 1987, David Williams ( a wonderful fellow) he took it extremely well until looking in his eyes as they started to well up really got to me also, a chance of a life time and I took that away from him, how do you think that makes you feel. (We remain very good friends today) however Dave did play in the GF side in 1988
  1. How long were you involved with coaching at the elite level?
  • I had Fourteen years at the elite level. (two years at St Kilda as reserves coach prior to all that.)Ballarat where I lived was zoned to StKilda in those days.
  • When you were head coach, how much assistance did you have around you?
  • Not much at all I had 2 assistant coaches (also u19 Coach) as well as a fitness and strength and conditioning. All clubs at that stage had very limited capital (and continued to let us know)
  • I had terrific team mangers (John Sell Melb, Graham Burgin Richmond) who did all the behind the scenes work as well as a great secretary. (Ondrea Moffat Melb)
  • By todays standard it takes 10 people to do the job my team manager and secretary did in those days.
  1. What is some advice you would give to an up and coming coach?
  • Be prepared to work hard in this environment it is not only two/ three training sessions a week followed by a match on Saturday to me it is 24/7
  • I put an enormous time into the preparation of training and games
  • My greatest speeches and moves have been at three am in the morning it is 24/7
  • Be honest and upfront with all personnel at the club and in particular good communication with your players, players make a club.
  • Look after and respect your staff, volunteers and supporters. Everyone in the organisation is important
  • To all players HONESTY without MALICE.

 

 

 

 

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